We are proud to announce that Wasafiri has been honoured by B-Corp as a ‘Best for the World 2019’ Company

Wasafiri is delighted to share a huge milestone! Generation Africa has announced the Top 12 GoGettaz Agripreneur Prize finalists for 2019 and the list is impressive! 

On the 15th January at around 3pm local time there was an armed attack on the Dusit Hotel in Nairobi, Kenya.

At this time we can confirm that all our staff members are safe and accounted for. However, we are deeply saddened to hear that a number of colleagues have lost friends. Our thoughts are with them all at this difficult time.

There has been a public appeal to donate blood at local hospitals in Nairobi, we would encourage our employees and friends to do so where possible.

 

Since inception, Wasafiri has understood profit as a goal secondary to achieving wider social value. Through the rigorous B-Corp certification process, this has now been formally recognised, joining the ranks of highly respected companies such as Patagonia and Ben & Jerry’s.

On November 3 2017, we lost Diana Ware,  a beloved friend, colleague, and Wasafiri family member.

A flame to ignite agriculture reform, nutrition and food security in Africa: will it be nurtured or snuffed out through irrelevance?

Through 2017 and 2018, Wasafiri will be extending our work from Africa and into the UK and the USA – here’s why:

When we set up Wasafiri, over 5 years ago now, it was because we saw a problem that we wanted to change. Between us we had been working on a variety of development issues across Africa; from climate change to conflict to agriculture – and the problem we recognised across all these different issues was less to do with the issues and more to do with the approach; and it was this approach that we wished to change.

Universal to all these very different problems was that these were not merely ‘technical’ problems – where solutions could be engineered- but rather systemic problems, that were deeply human in their nature. The sort of problems that no one institution, however brilliant or rich, could change on their own. So Wasafiri was set up to offer a different way to approach these sorts of problems. An approach rooted in collaborative action, in multi-stakeholder engagement, in bringing together those committed to making change and together figuring out, imperfect but practical action.

Over the last 5 years we have worked with partners from DFID to USAID, from private investors to global foundations, and we have been part of some significant change; and have learnt a great deal. We have been part of Grow Africa’s ability to engage governments and the private sector in catalysing over $2 billion of investment into agriculture on the continent. We have supported countries who have wanted to access Green Climate Fund investment with developing their plans. We have worked to help those effected by violent extremism in the Horn of Africa and those funding efforts to counter violent extremism to figure out how to support community resilience. And through this work, some of which has been more effective than others, we have learnt a great deal about what it means to work in complex systems and navigate complex problems.

However, complex systems and problems are not just found in Africa, or even just in developing countries. Rather these are universal problems many of which, like climate change, transcend national boundaries. From police –community relationships in the USA, to anti-microbial  resistance, to the muddle of the NHS in the UK, or the challenges of rising inequality across all wealthy countries – we live in a world of complex problems. Indeed the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals, and their explicit application to all countries underlined the universal and ongoing nature of development.

And so over the next year we at Wasafiri want to explore how we can bring the approach we have developed, and the lessons we have learnt about working in complex systems to issues outside of Africa. Initially we will be exploring opportunities in the UK and the USA – opportunities where there are not simple solutions, where many different actors need to collaborate – and where that is not easy to do. It is in these messy spaces where we have to come together and create the path by walking it.